English Country Style Home

This charming 1926 English Country style stone and stucco home is located next to the Indian Hill Club in Winnetka.  The home features beautiful original leaded windows and ivy climbing lazily around the exterior.

The gorgeous floor in the entry takes you toward an inviting living room and stair with detailed newel posts and railing.

Here are a few more photos of the interior.

The pool in the backyard is surrounded by trees offering wonderful scenery, and complete privacy.

Beautifully decorated und updated for today’s living; isn’t this a wonderful home!

Have a great week!

Advertisements

Charles Ringling Home in Evanston, Illinois

Charles Ringling, yes that Ringling, built this remarkable home in Evanston in 1914.

Ringling hired architect Alfred C. Clas to design his home.

The elegant entry features a gorgeous stair that leads to a spacious second floor landing.

This comfortable library has glass front book shelves and a working fireplace.

Here are a few more photos of the home.

Situated on a corner lot near Lake Michigan, it offers beautiful landscaping in both the front and back.  Also in the back is a 3 car garage with a three bedroom coach house.

Read more about the home’s history here.

Architect Clas, of Ferry and Clas, are also responsible for Hiram Smith Hall on the University of Wisconsin campus in Madison,

Joseph Vilas, Jr. house in Manitowac, Wisconsin,

and the Jacob van Orden house in Baraboo, Wisconsin

Have a great week!

Astor Street Row House by John Wellborn Root

John Wellborn Root, along with Daniel Burnham, founded the architecture firm Burnham and Root in 1873.  Their firm was responsible for many of the earliest skyscrapers every built worldwide.  He is considered one of the founders of the Chicago School style along with Burnham, Dankmar Adler, and Louis Sullivan, among others.

The firm Burnham and Root were responsible for overseeing the design and construction of the World’s Columbian Exposition and this home is mentioned frequently in the book The Devil in the White City.

This home was completed in 1888 and Root lived there with his family until his death from pneumonia only 2 years later.

This home features beautiful leaded windows and plaster relief ceilings.

There is a graceful stair and wonderful fretwork.

Isn’t it beautiful?

Have a great week!

Tiny Home in London

Here is a remarkable transformation.  Architect Fiona Kirkwood transformed a dilapidated workshop, which is just over 12 feet wide at its widest, into a comfortable and attractive two bedroom, 2 bathroom home.

Kirkwood was restricted by laws requiring that the project not interfere with neighbors’ access to natural light which affected the exterior footprint.

The living room and kitchen, which are actually in the basement, have a surprising amount of natural light.  Kirkwood accomplished this by lifting the basement floor as high as possible which allows for a view into the rear courtyard through a back wall that is almost completely comprised of glass.

By installing a brick floor in the basement level and extending it into the courtyard, the space seems to expand.

Much thought was giving to efficient and attractive storage.

Not everyone would be comfortable in such a tiny space, but this project successfully shows you that it can be done.   You can read the entire article by Catherine Macaulay here.

Have a great week!